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Concussions

NOT OK? DON'T PLAY!


A concussion is a brain injury caused by any blow to the head, face, or neck, or somewhere else on the body,
which results in a sudden jarring of the head. A concussion can’t be seen on routine x-rays, CT scans or MRIs.

You don’t have to lose consciousness to have a concussion.
Signs and symptoms may be immediate or delayed for a period of time.

Up-to-date information on concussions and concussion management is on these websites:
Concussion Awareness Training Tool – Medical Professionals
Ontario Injury Prevention Compass – Concussions in Ontario
Guidelines for Pediatric Concussion, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation
CanChild – Centre for Child Disability Research, McMaster University

School Board Concussion Policy and Protocol

London and District Catholic School Board

Thames Valley District School Board

Signs and symptoms

Physical


Concussion management

Initial response for a suspected concussion

Loss of consciousness
  • Suspect a possible neck injury
  • Initiate Emergency Action Plan and call 911
  • Do NOT move the player or remove athletic equipment (i.e. helmet)
  • Wait for paramedics (EMS) to arrive

 No loss of consciousness

  • Remove the student from activity/practice/game
  • Player must not return to activity/practice/game that day
  • Do not leave the player alone
  • Monitor for signs and symptoms of a concussion
  • Do not administer medication
  • The player needs to be evaluated by a doctor as soon as possible

Inform the parent/guardian of the suspected concussion and that the player should be seen by a doctor as soon as possible.

Signs and symptoms of a concussion often last for 7 to 10 days or may last longer, even weeks or
months. The most important initial treatment for a concussion is both physical and mental rest. That means no
exercising, bike riding, playing video games, reading or working on the computer.

For more information and for the Return to Play Guidelines for parents and coaches, visit the Parachute.org website.


Content adapted with permission of the Community and Health Services Department of The Regional Municipality of York.